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Tatoyan: Presence of Illegal Azerbaijani Armed Units in Armenia, Citing Ongoing Security Concerns


Tatoyan: Presence of Illegal Azerbaijani Armed Units in Armenia, Citing Ongoing Security Concerns

Armenia's security landscape is facing significant challenges, as highlighted by Arman Tatoyan, the director of the Tatoyan Foundation and former Human Rights Defender (ombudsman) of Armenia. In a Facebook post, Tatoyan emphasized the presence of illegal armed units from Azerbaijan within Armenia, highlighting the potential threat they pose to national security.


Tatoyan pointed out the often-overlooked issue of Azerbaijani illegal armed units operating within Armenia's borders. These units, through criminal activities and their mere presence, have jeopardized Armenia's security. Their activities have rendered life exceedingly difficult for residents of Gegharkunik, Vayots Dzor, and Syunik Provinces in Armenia.


"Goris [city] and Tegh [village of Armenia], which used to serve as part of the Artsakh [(Nagorno-Karabakh)] road, are now isolated due to the closure of the Artsakh road by Azerbaijan. Additionally, the Azerbaijani armed forces have impeded Kapan's air communications through criminal shootings. Land transportation routes continue to face security challenges," Tatoyan observed.


Tatoyan's comments come in the wake of ongoing concerns related to security and connectivity in the region. The closure of the Artsakh road and criminal activities along transportation routes have disrupted normalcy in affected areas.

Tatoyan indicated that his visit to Syunik Province was not solely for fact-finding purposes but also to implement several important initiatives aimed at addressing the security challenges faced by these regions.


The presence of unauthorized armed units from Azerbaijan within Armenia underscores the complexities surrounding post-conflict stability and security in the South Caucasus. As Armenia navigates these security concerns, Tatoyan's observations shed light on the multifaceted challenges that need to be addressed for the well-being of the affected communities.




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